Upcoming Telebriefing on Exchange 2010 Friday, Dec 18 2009 

I will be the presenter in a Burton Group TeleBriefing on January 12th and 13th. The details are below:

Another Burton Group TeleBriefing

Service: Collaboration and Content

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Topic: “Transitioning” to Exchange 2010: Is It Worth the Effort?

Presented by: Bill Pray

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A challenge for Microsoft with the Exchange 2010 release is to convince customers that it does something new enough to “transition.” Moving to Exchange 2010 is not an in-place upgrade. It is a transition — making the move more expensive and complex for the enterprise. Microsoft also focused much of the development of Exchange 2010 to rebuild it for software-as-a-service Exchange Online offerings. Therefore, what does Exchange 2010 offer to the enterprise that justifies the transition? In this TeleBriefing, Analyst Bill Pray reviews Exchange 2010 and provides insight into the business case for and against upgrading to Exchange 2010.

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Dates:

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

2:00 p.m ET/ 11:00 a.m PT/ 19:00 UTC GMT /20:00 CET

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

9:00 a.m. ET/6:00 a.m. PT/14:00 UTC GMT/15:00 CET

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Registration options:

– Register online

http://campaign.burtongroup.com:80/CT00220101MjM1OQAA.HTML

– Call 800.824.9924 ext. 174 (for calls outside the U.S., dial +1.801.304.8174)

Notes about attendance:

– Attendance at this online web event is limited. Register early.

– Once you have registered, you will receive a confirmation and

dial-up instructions.

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What is a TeleBriefing?

Burton Group TeleBriefings offer an interactive forum providing clients with in-depth and pertinent information related to a specific topic. Sessions are hosted by Burton Group experts and topics complement Burton Group research.

Access related content

(http://campaign.burtongroup.com:80/CT00220102MjM1OQAA.HTML)

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To add other people in your organization to this alert service, visit http://campaign.burtongroup.com:80/CT00220103MjM1OQAA.HTML.

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On Today’s CCS Blog – Exchange 2010 Podcast Monday, Nov 9 2009 

I had the opportunity to ask a couple of questions of Michael Atalla, Group Product Manager for Microsoft Exchange and Steve Schafer, Director of Global Information Systems for Global Crossing (an Exchange 2010 customer) about the value of upgrading to Exchange 2010 and posted the responses in a podcast on the CCS blog.

E-mail Archiving Wednesday, Sep 2 2009 

One of my current research topics is enterprise e-mail archiving, with a particular emphasis on the integrated archiving coming in near future
releases of Exchange 2010 and Notes 8.5.1. Interestingly, many organizations seem to believe that backups are enough and can be a defacto archive as needed. My CCS blog today is E-mail: Archive vs. Backup.

iPhone and Enterprise E-mail… A Few Months Later Friday, Oct 24 2008 

When Apple released its iPhone 3G earlier this summer, Apple touted it as “The best phone for business. Ever.” For most users, that means enterprise e-mail, calendar, and contacts on the device. 

The iPhone 3G launched with a native support for Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync – a logical, but interesting choice for Apple. Logical because Microsoft Exchange is, by most measures, the leading e-mail solution in the market. Interesting in that, given the desktop marketing wars between “Mac and PC”, one wonders why Apple did not provide native support for IBM’s Lotus Notes also.

So where do things stand with other enterprise e-mail solutions a few months later? Below is a quick summary for IT shops that do not have Microsoft Exchange:

Google GAPE: For the iPhone, Google provides a tailored web interface. Another option is Gmail for mobile, a Java-based e-mail application. Gmail also supports IMAP synchronization of e-mail to iPhone’s native e-mail client.

IBM Lotus NotesIBM announced at the end of September the release of iNotes Ultralite software that supports Lotus Notes on the iPhone. The software is free for anyone with a Lotus Notes license. iNotes Ultralite is web application that leverages the Safari browser on the iPhone to access the Lotus Notes functions. The advantage is that since it is a browser, no data is stored on the iPhone (except in the browser cache), should the iPhone turn up missing.  However, it is not a client, so no data on the device also means no synchronization with the iPhone’s native e-mail, calendar, and contacts functionality.

Novell GroupWise: GroupWise 7 ships with GroupWise Mobile Server – an OEMed product from Nokia for mobile e-mail, calendar, and contacts for GroupWise. GroupWise Mobile Server does not support iPhone and, with the latest end of life announcement from Nokia for the product, will not in the future. Novell customers can utilize a partner solution recently released from Notify Technology that provides full support for the iPhone and GroupWise through the native iPhone functionality using ActiveSync.

Oracle Beehive: Using IMAP, Oracle Beehive e-mail is supported on the iPhone. Another option is to install Oracle Beehive Integration for Outlook, through which iPhone users can also synchronize calendar entries, tasks, and contacts through iTunes. Like Novell GroupWise, Notify Technology provides a technically better solution for Oracle Beehive also, with full support for the iPhone and Beehive through the native iPhone functionality.

Yahoo! Zimbra: Zimbra supports the Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync protocol, which permits the iPhone to synchronize with Zimbra exactly as it would with Exchange. 

In sum, a few months later, there are ways for all of the enterprise solutions to get e-mail to the iPhone – mostly through IMAP or an optimized iPhone browser access. However, because Apple chose to support ActiveSync, the rich client experience of synchronization of e-mail, calendar, and contacts with the native iPhone clients is only available to those solutions that support ActiveSync. For IBM, Novell, and Oracle this means a web client, or a third party solution like Notify Technologies that connects their product with the iPhone through ActiveSync.

If Apple wants the iPhone to be “The best phone for business. Ever.”, Apple needs to add support for other e-mail vendors, notably IBM, to deliver synchronized enterprise e-mail, calendar, and contacts.

Note:  This is a cross-posting from the Collaboration and Content Strategies blog.

E-mail as a Managed Service Wednesday, Sep 24 2008 

I had the opportunity to speak with Scott Gode, VP of Marketing and Product Management for Azaleos, yesterday. Azaleos provides managed service offerings for organizations using Exchange.  They also have a beta going for SharePoint managed services.

A couple of insights that I came away with after the conversation:

1. The interest in SaaS e-mail offerings is also creating interest in managed services for e-mail.  Not all organizations are willing or able to make the transition to a hosted e-mail service, but still want some of the advantages hosted e-mail offers for their IT departments.  

Under a managed service model, the organization still has the solution on premise and pays for licenses and hardware, but the management and monitoring of the solution is outsourced to a third party, saving on internal IT resources.  

So, the managed services model still gives an organization complete control (and the associated expenses) of their e-mail solution (especially important to an organization concerned about the security of the e-mail content) as it is still on premise, but the day-to-day work to maintain is outsourced for a predictable recurring cost.  

2. Virtualizing Exchange can successfully be done, but you need to know the limits and optimize.  

Scott’s team lives in the Exchange world and has developed expertise in virtualizing Exchange.  Scott stated that they have benchmarked a virtualized Exchange implementation as high as 3,000 users. The metrics Scott’s team used were reasonable. However, keep in mind that any benchmark with an e-mail solution is just an indicator, your mileage will vary.  

For example, I once worked with a luxury home construction company with e-mail users that were pretty average in their use (volume, frequency, etc.) except… they liked to add CAD drawings as attachments. The large file attachments created unanticipated loads within their system and caused issues for outgoing e-mails.